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Health and Well-being

The Student Health works preventively and with issues related to health and well-being and offers individual counselling and courses, workshops and lectures.

Read more about

Mental health

Stress

Sleep

Physical activity

Diet

Alcohol, narcotics and tobacco

Sexual health

Mental health

Feelings of despondency, lack of drive and sadness are a natural part of life and a normal reaction to grief, stress, conflict, failure, and sudden life events. Also anxiety and fatigue, which is caused by insufficient recovery, can lead to depression. Anxiety and depression can impair your study performance. Student Health, therefore, offers several opportunities of support, individual or group counselling free of charge, designed to manage anxiety, worry and negative thoughts.

Some ways of improving your state of mind

  • Talk to somebody: It can be a friend, partner or family member. Help each other out!
  • Spend time with other people, either physically or digitally – even if you don’t feel like it.
  • Do the things you usually enjoy, even if they’re not appealing just at the moment.
  • Look after yourself: Make sure you get enough sleep, eat healthily, and get some exercise. Get outdoors, to absorb some light and energy.
  • Be kind to yourself: try to avoid being judgemental. Instead, try to accept your feelings. Depression hits everyone, at some time.
  • If the cause of your depression can be changed or modified, start working to bring about that change.
  • Establish clear routines, and avoid turning night into day.
  • Avoid alcohol and other drugs.

Counselling at the Student Health

Courses and workshops at the Student Health

About feeling low and what low mood is from NHS

About feeling anxious and worried from NHS

Stress

Many people feel stressed when they are students. It’s easy for feelings of insufficiency to arise, and start to worry that you have not studied enough, since the pace of study at university is often high. Stress and stress hormones are necessary, and arouse in us the desire to perform well, develop, and do things that feel meaningful. It’s impossible to live without stress, and it’s not dangerous to feel under stress from time to time. The body has evolved to react when we experience threats or danger. However, it is often not the stress itself that causes problems, rather that we do not ensure sufficient recovery. It is important to find a balance between activity and rest.

The Student Health offers several forms of stress management such as courses, lectures, workshops and individual counselling. Aided by the support from the Student Health that is most suitable for you, you can rediscover your sources of energy and learn how to find a more balanced way to manage your stress factors.

Courses and workshops at the Student Health

You can also order a presentation or workshop for your class, student group or student organization.

Contact the Student Health using the contact form

More information on stress, health and wellbeing

Sleep

How much sleep we need differs from person to person, but most people need 6-8 hours a night. Sleep, and in particular deep sleep, is important for recovery. Sleep also plays a decisive role in establishing memories, and is therefore especially important when we study and are learning new things. Difficulty getting to sleep and unrestful sleep are common, and often depend on stress, tension or unsuitable habits. It is, therefore, a good idea to keep regular hours for your sleep, and get up and go to bed at the same time every day.

Physical activity

During physical exertion we consume and get rid of the excess stress hormones (such as adrenalin and noradrenalin) that are produced when we live under mental stress or feel troubled. Getting frequent and moderate exercise (at least 30 minutes a day) has beneficial effects for our health. It’s a good idea when studying to stand up and move around at least a few minutes every hour. And getting outdoors in daylight every day, such as cycling or walking to the university or taking a lunchtime walk, is a great way of getting exercise.

Diet

A well-balanced diet is necessary to enable students to cope. Failing to give priority to food intake can have physical consequences, and lead to insufficient energy for study with swings in mental well-being. Just as you must eat well and get sufficient exercise if you are to perform well, the brain needs energy to function. However, even though this is obvious for many people, we tend to forget it when under stress to complete an assignment on time. Remember to eat properly – even when faced with a deadline. It will help you perform better.

If you suspect that you are having problems with your eating habits, contact Student Health for a consultation.

Alcohol, narcotics and tobacco

Preventive work around alcohol, narcotics and tobacco is an important part of the Student Health. We meet not only students who want to change their own usage habits, but also those who are anxious about someone close to them. Make an appointment with us for a consultation when the use of alcohol, your own or one of your friends, becomes a problem.

As part of our preventive work, we work with the student unions and sections to ensure in various ways that parties and celebrations at the university do not become harmful.

The Student Health is also responsible for training the mentors who receive new students at the start of term. More than 1,500 mentors are trained every year. The purpose of the training is to reinforce mentors in their role during the reception activities, and give them the perspective, knowledge and methods that can contribute to a positive reception of new students.

LiU's Policy for alcohol och other drugs (pdf in Swedish)

Univeristy-wide receprion policy 2021 (pdf in Swedish)

Sexual health

Good sexual health means that you have the opportunity for enjoyable and safe sexual experiences when you want them – experiences that are free from compulsion, violence and discrimination. Sexual health can change through life, and can be influenced by several factors, such as stress, depression and some diseases. If you need guidance about how to contact the healthcare system for help with problems in this area, book an appointment with Student Health or contact us by telephone.

STI Clinics

If you are anxious that you may have picked up a sexually transferred infection (STI), you should book an appointment at an STI clinic, or at a youth guidance centre (Ungdomsmottagning) if you are younger than 26.

 


Page manager: studenthalsan@liu.se
Last updated: 2021-10-27